Justin Malonson

‘He’s Disabled,’ the Caregiver Screamed. ‘I’m With Her,’ Eyad Cried. The Cop Opened Fire Anyway

Eyad Hallaq was shot to death in a roofless garbage room. According to the testimony of his caregiver, who was by his side and tried to protect him, he was executed. For long minutes she stood next to him and pleaded for his life, trying to explain to the police officers, in Hebrew and in Arabic, that he suffered from a disability. They shot him three times from close range with a rifle, directly into the center of his body, as he lay on his back, wounded and terrified, on the floor of the room.

The garbage room is located in a narrow courtyard in Jerusalem’s Old City, inside Lions Gate, exactly at the start of the Via Dolorosa, where Jesus walked from the site of his trial to the place of his crucifixion, on what’s now called King Faisal Street. It’s just a few dozen meters from the entrance to the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound. The sanctity of the area did not help Hallaq. Nor did the fact that he was someone with special needs, a 32-year-old autistic person, the apple of the eye of his parents, who devoted their lives to looking after him.

Hallaq was afraid of blood: His mother shaved him in the morning, for fear he would cut himself. Every scratch threw him into a panic, she says. He was also afraid of the armed police officers who stood along the route to the special needs center he went to, where participated in a vocational training program. His instructor taught him how to make his way there alone on foot – it took a month before he dared walk the route by himself – a little more than a kilometer from his home in the Wadi Joz neighborhood into the Old City.

Read more: ‘He’s Disabled,’ the Caregiver Screamed. ‘I’m With Her,’ Eyad Cried. The Cop Opened Fire Anyway

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I Wish I Had a Billion-Dollars so I Can Give Big Tips to People Who Deserve it

This piece was inspired solely from an encounter I had on 6/6/20 with a Door Dash driver. What struck me about him was how humble and kind he was. There are some people who just have that energy which changes yours. It has nothing to do with what they say, it’s just their aura. Simply being in their presence has a beneficial effect on your energy field. I was having a pretty bad day with my mind dwelling on the negative. I worked the whole day, and had cravings for sweets.

Fighting the urge, I ordered a low-carb high protein meal devoid of sugar. With the tracking system, I was able to see when the driver was close, so I went downstairs and in the front of the building. As I stood outside, the breeze felt refreshing after being cooped up inside all day sitting in front of a computer screen. When the driver arrived, he thanked me for coming out because he said he was worried that he wouldn’t be able to find the place thinking that the building number meant I lived in one of the tall upscale buildings with luxury amenities. I wish I did, but I told him that it was just this rusty old residence I was at. He thanked me and gave a kind gesture bowing his head, making my day.

I felt bad I only gave a two-dollar tip, I wish I could have given him a million, not for any reason other than being a sincere kind gentlemen, something I think is rare to find these days. As I returned to my lounge with my meal, I savored every bite while thinking about his kindness. My loud friend then arrived ending my peaceful dinner. My friend is famous in Asia being a TV star, and talked about the usual things which typically was centered on himself. I thought about telling him about the wonderful man I met, but I just continued eating. Then he was glued to his phone as usual and then told me someone he knew died in an accident in Thailand. It is weird how you can go from depressed and agitated, to meeting a stranger who uplifts you, and then meet a friend who tells you bad news. Ah, nothing like riding the daily waves of human emotion. Thank goodness for that Zen state of mind.

After finishing, I then decided to tell my friend about the wonderful fellow who delivered my delicious meal. My friend then asked what did the driver do that was so special, but that was the point, he did not do anything. He was just sincere. I said that it was his energy and humbleness, and my friend replied, “Like me?” He was right, just like him. My friend has that actor’s personality which demands attention, but despite his fame, my friend is a down to earth great guy who genuinely wants to help those less fortunate.

My meal came with a set of plastic utensils and a napkin, but I will keep that white spoon to remember that day when I met a kind genuine human being. This is what the world needs more of. They say you remember people by how they made you feel. I do not know who he was, and I probably will never see him again, but what I will remember was his smile and how humble and kind he was as if he was honored to deliver my food.

I generally have a low opinion of the human race, but every so often I come across a song, a work of art, or in this case, a person, who gives me belief that there still are good people out there. I will do my best to be such a person. If there is a bright future for us, it is going to be due to these kinds of people, not government or technocracy. The gods do not seem to care, so it is up to the human spirit to raise the consciousness on this earth and steer the evolution of human beings in a positive direction.

Doubts over Oxford vaccine as it fails to stop coronavirus in animal trials

The Oxford University vaccine tipped as a “front runner” in the race to develop a coronavirus jab does not stop the virus in monkeys and may only be partially effective, experts have warned.

A trial of the vaccine in rhesus macaque monkeys did not stop the animals from catching the virus and has raised questions about the vaccine’s likely human efficacy and ongoing development.

The vaccine, known as ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, is undergoing human trials in Britain. The Government has brokered a deal between Oxford University and the drug company AstraZeneca to produce up to 30 million doses if it proves successful, having ploughed £47 million into the research.

“All of the vaccinated monkeys treated with the Oxford vaccine became infected when challenged as judged by recovery of virus genomic RNA from nasal secretions,” said Dr William Haseltine, a former Harvard Medical School professor who had a pivotal role in the development of early HIV/Aids treatments.

“There was no difference in the amount of viral RNA detected from this site in the vaccinated monkeys as compared to the unvaccinated animals. Which is to say, all vaccinated animals were infected,” Dr Haseltine wrote in an article on Forbes. 

Read more: Doubts over Oxford vaccine as it fails to stop coronavirus in animal trials

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Boris Johnson to set out plans to ‘rebuild Britain’ which his spineless idiocy has destroyed (and Keir Starmer would have been even worse)

Boris Johnson will soon set out plans to “rebuild Britain” in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, amid reports he wants to ease lockdown restrictions quickly to save millions of jobs.

The Prime Minister is expected to use a major speech to effectively relaunch the Conservatives’ domestic agenda after the Government’s attention turned to the Covid-19 crisis, during which the Tories’ poll rating has plummeted.

Mr Johnson will this week chair a meeting of his Cabinet to update them on the next lockdown-easing steps for a number of sectors, which are expected to take effect from June 15.

The Sunday Times reported that the PM will unveil plans to ease restrictions on weddings and funerals from next month, as well as possible measures to reopen hairdressers before July 4.

And the paper said Mr Johnson has told Transport Secretary Grant Shapps to secure “travel corridor” deals with holiday hotspots by June 28.

Read more: Boris Johnson to set out plans to ‘rebuild Britain’ which his spineless idiocy has destroyed (and Keir Starmer would have been even worse)

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Elite-owned BBC desperately defends and arse-licks its funder Bill Gates

In 2015, an unassuming-looking Bill Gates came on stage at the TED conference in Vancouver to issue a dire warning.

“If anything kills over 10 million people over the next few decades, it is likely to be a highly infectious virus rather than war,” he told the audience.

His prescient words picked up some coverage at the time, including from the BBC – but largely went unheeded.

But now, the video of this talk has now been viewed more than 64 million times – with many people more interested in the reasons behind that speech than the talk itself.

Some accuse of him of leading a class of global elites. Others believe he is leading efforts to depopulate the world. 

Still more accuse him of making vaccines mandatory, or even attempting to implant microchips into people.

The face of public health

“There are myriad conspiracies surrounding Bill Gates,” said Rory Smith, from fact-checkers First Draft News.

“He is this kind of voodoo doll that all these communities are pricking with their own conspiracies. And it is unsurprising he has become the voodoo doll – because he has always been the face of public health.”

Read more: Elite-owned BBC desperately defends and arse-licks its funder Bill Gates

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